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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

excluded, and so it would seem probable is the extremely fair type, for 

blue eyes have not, on the whole, been considered to form part of the 

admired type. 

 

If we turn to England no serious modification of this conclusion is called 

for. Beauty is still fair. Indeed, the very word "fair" in England itself 

means beautiful. That in the seventeenth century it was generally held 

essential that beauty should be blonde is indicated by a passage in the 

_Anatomy of Melancholy_, where Burton argues that "golden hair was ever 

in great account," and quotes many examples from classic and more modern 

literature.[163] That this remains the case is sufficiently evidenced by 

the fact that the ballet and chorus on the English stage wear yellow wigs, 

and the heroine of the stage is blonde, while the female villain of 

melodrama is a brunette. 

 

 

 

While, however, this admiration of fairness as a mark of beauty 

unquestionably prevails in England, I do not think it can be said--as it 

probably can be said of the neighboring and closely allied country of 

France--that the most beautiful women belong to the fairest group of the 

community. In most parts of Europe the coarse and unbeautiful plebeian 

type tends to be very dark; in England it tends to be very fair. England 

is, however, somewhat fairer generally than most parts of Europe; so that, 

while it may be said that a very beautiful woman in France or in Spain may 

belong to the blondest section of the community, a very beautiful woman in 

England, even though of the same degree of blondness as her Continental 

sister, will not belong to the extremely blonde section of the English 

community. It thus comes about that when we are in northern France we find 

that gray eyes, a very fair but yet unfreckled complexion, brown hair, 

finely molded features, and highly sensitive facial expression combine to 

constitute a type which is more beautiful than any other we meet in 

France, and it belongs to the fairest section of the French population. 

When we cross over to England, however, unless we go to a so-called 

"Celtic" district, it is hopeless to seek among the blondest section of 

the community for any such beautiful and refined type. The English 

beautiful woman, though she may still be fair, is by no means very fair, 

and from the English standpoint she may even sometimes appear somewhat 

dark:[164] In determining what I call the index of pigmentation--or degree 

of darkness of the eyes and hair--of different groups in the National 

Portrait Gallery I found that the "famous beauties" (my own personal 

criterion of beauty not being taken into account) was somewhat nearer to 

the dark than to the light end of the scale.[165] If we consider, at 

random, individual instances of famous English beauties they are not 

extremely fair. Lady Venetia Stanley, in the early seventeenth century, 

who became the wife of Sir Kenelm Digby, was somewhat dark, with brown 

hair and eyebrows. Mrs. Overall, a little later in the same century, a 


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