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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Lancashire woman, the wife of the Dean of St. Paul's, was, says Aubrey, 

"the greatest beauty in her time in England," though very wanton, with 

"the loveliest eyes that were ever seen"; if we may trust a ballad given 

by Aubrey she was dark with black hair. The Gunnings, the famous beauties 

of the eighteenth century, were not extremely fair, and Lady Hamilton, the 

most characteristic type of English beauty, had blue, brown-flecked eyes 

and dark chestnut hair. Coloration is only one of the elements of beauty, 

though an important one. Other things being equal, the most blonde is most 

beautiful; but it so happens that among the races of Great Britain the 

other things are very frequently not equal, and that, notwithstanding a 

conviction ingrained in the language, with us the fairest of women is not 

always the "fairest." So magical, however, is the effect of brilliant 

coloring that it serves to keep alive in popular opinion an unqualified 

belief in the universal European creed of the beauty of blondness. 

 

We have seen that underlying the conception of beauty, more especially as 

it manifests itself in woman to man, are to be found at least three 

fundamental elements: First there is the general beauty of the species as 

it tends to culminate in the white peoples of European origin; then there 

is the beauty due to the full development or even exaggeration of the 

sexual and more especially the secondary sexual characters; and last there 

is the beauty due to the complete embodiment of the particular racial or 

national type. To make the analysis fairly complete must be added at least 

one other factor: the influence of individual taste. Every individual, at 

all events in civilization, within certain narrow limits, builds up a 

feminine ideal of his own, in part on the basis of his own special 

organization and its demands, in part on the actual accidental attractions 

he has experienced. It is unnecessary to emphasize the existence of this 

factor, which has always to be taken into account in every consideration 

of sexual selection in civilized man. But its variations are numerous and 

in impassioned lovers it may even lead to the idealization of features 

which are in reality the reverse of beautiful. It may be said of many a 

man, as d'Annunzio says of the hero of his _Trionfo della Morte_ in 

relation to the woman he loved, that "he felt himself bound to her by the 

real qualities of her body, and not only by those which were most 

beautiful, but specially by _those which were least beautiful_" (the 

novelist italicizes these words), so that his attention was fixed upon her 

defects, and emphasized them, thus arousing within himself an impetuous 

state of desire. Without invoking defects, however, there are endless 

personal variations which may all be said to come within the limits of 

possible beauty or charm. "There are no two women," as Stratz remarks, 

"who in exactly the same way stroke back a rebellious lock from their 


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