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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

brows, no two who hold the hand in greeting in exactly the same way, no 

two who gather up their skirts as they walk with exactly the same 

movement."[166] Among the multitude of minute differences--which yet can 

be seen and felt--the beholder is variously attracted or repelled 

according to his own individual idiosyncrasy, and the operations of sexual 

selection are effected accordingly. 

 

 

 

Another factor in the constitution of the ideal of beauty, but one perhaps 

exclusively found under civilized conditions, is the love of the unusual, 

the remote, the exotic. It is commonly stated that rarity is admired in 

beauty. This is not strictly true, except as regards combinations and 

characters which vary only in a very slight degree from the generally 

admired type. "_Jucundum nihil est quod non reficit variatas_," according 

to the saying of Publilius Syrus. The greater nervous restlessness and 

sensibility of civilization heightens this tendency, which is not 

infrequently found also among men of artistic genius. One may refer, for 

instance, to Baudelaire's profound admiration for the mulatto type of 

beauty.[167] In every great centre of civilization the national ideal of 

beauty tends to be somewhat modified in exotic directions, and foreign 

ideals, as well as foreign fashions, become preferred to those that are 

native. It is significant of this tendency that when, a few years since, 

an enterprising Parisian journal hung in its _salle_ the portraits of one 

hundred and thirty-one actresses, etc., and invited the votes of the 

public by ballot as to the most beautiful of them, not one of the three 

women who came out at the head of the poll was French. A dancer of Belgian 

origin (Cleo de Merode) was by far at the head with over 3000 votes, 

followed by an American from San Francisco (Sybil Sanderson), and then a 

Polish woman. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[134] Figured in Mau's _Pompeii_, p. 174. 

 

[135] As a native of Lukunor said to the traveler Mertens, "It has the 

same object as your clothes, to please the women." 

 

[136] "The greatest provocations of lust are from our apparel," as Burton 

states (_Anatomy of Melancholy_, Part III, Sec. II, Mem. II, Subs. III), 

illustrating this proposition with immense learning. Stanley Hall 

(_American Journal of Psychology_, vol. ix, Part III, pp. 365 _et seq._) 

has some interesting observations on the various psychic influences of 

clothing; cf. Bloch, _Beitraege zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, 

Teil II, pp. 330 et seq. 

 

[137] _History of Human Marriage_, Chapter IX, especially p, 201. We have 

a striking and comparatively modern European example of an article of 

clothing designed to draw attention to the sexual sphere in the codpiece 

(the French _braguette_), familiar to us through fifteenth and sixteenth 

century pictures and numerous allusions in Rabelais and in Elizabethan 

literature. This was originally a metal box for the protection of the 

sexual organs in war, but subsequently gave place to a leather case only 


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