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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

English translations, 1814, vol. iii. p. 236) that they "have as great an 

antipathy to the beard as the Eastern nations hold it in reverence. This 

antipathy is derived from the same source as the predilection for flat 

foreheads, which is seen in so singular a manner in the statues of the 

Aztec heroes and divinities. Nations attach the idea of beauty to 

everything which particularly characterizes their own physical 

conformation, their natural physiognomy." See also Westermarck, _History 

of Marriage_, p. 261. Ripley (_Races of Europe_, pp. 49, 202) attaches 

much importance to the sexual selection founded on a tendency of this 

kind. 

 

[153] "Differences of race are irreducible," Abel Hermant remarks 

(_Confession d'un Enfant d'Hier_, p. 209), "and between two beings who 

love each other they cannot fail to produce exceptional and instructive 

reactions. In the first superficial ebullition of love, indeed, nothing 

notable may be manifested, but in a fairly short time the two lovers, 

innately hostile, in striving to approach each other strike against an 

invisible partition which separates them. Their sensibilities are 

divergent; everything in each shocks the other; even their anatomical 

conformation, even the language of their gestures; all is foreign." 

 

[154] C.H. Stratz, _Die Schoenheit des Weiblichen Koerpers_, fourteenth 

edition, Chapter XII. 

 

[155] See, e.g., Sergi, _The Mediterranean Race_, pp. 59-75. 

 

[156] Sergi (_The Mediterranean Race_, Chapter 1), by an analysis of 

Homer's color epithets, argues that in very few cases do they involve 

fairness; but his attempt scarcely seems successful, although most of 

these epithets are undoubtedly vague and involve a certain range of 

possible color. 

 

[157] Lechat's study of the numerous realistic colored statues recently 

discovered in Greece (summarized in _Zentralblatt fuer Anthropologie_, 

1904, ht. 1, p. 22) shows that with few exceptions the hair is fair. 

 

[158] Renier, _Il Tipo Estetico_, pp. 127 et seq. In another book, _Les 

Femmes Blondes selon les Peintres de l'Ecole de Venise_, par deux 

Venitiens (one of these "Venetians" being Armand Baschet), is brought 

together much information concerning the preference for blondes in 

literature, together with a great many of the recipes anciently used for 

making the hair fair. 

 

[159] J. Houdoy, _La Beaute des Femmes dans la Litterature et dans l'Art 

du XIIe au XVIe Siecle_, 1876, pp. 32 et seq. 

 

[160] Houdoy, op. cit., pp. 41 et seq. 

 

[161] Houdoy, op. cit., p. 83. 

 

[162] Brantome, _Vie des Dames Galantes_, Discours II. 

 

[163] _Anatomy of Melancholy_, Part III, Sec. II, Mem. II, Subs. II. 

 

[164] It is significant that Burton (_Anatomy of Melancholy_, loc. cit.), 

while praising golden hair, also argues that "of all eyes black are moist 

amiable," quoting many examples to this effect from classic and later 

literature. 

 

[165] "Relative Abilities of the Fair and the Dark," _Monthly Review_, 


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