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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

conjunction with music to make the appeal of beauty more convincing in the 

process of sexual selection. 

 

It may be in place here to mention, in passing, the considerable 

place which vision occupies in normal and abnormal methods of 

heightening tumescence under circumstances which exclude definite 

selection by beauty. The action of mirrors belongs to this group 

of phenomena. Mirrors are present in profusion in high-class 

brothels--on the walls and also above the beds. Innocent youths 

and girls are also often impelled to contemplate themselves in 

mirrors and sometimes thus, produce the first traces of sexual 

excitement. I have referred to the developed forms of this kind 

of self-contemplation in the Study of Auto-erotism, and in this 

connection have alluded to the fable of Narcissus, whence Naecke 

has since devised the term Narcissism for this group of 

phenomena. It is only necessary to mention the enormous 

production of photographs, representing normal and abnormal 

sexual actions, specially prepared for the purpose of exciting or 

of gratifying sexual appetites, and the frequency with which even 

normal photographs of the nude appeal to the same lust of the 

eyes. 

 

Pygmalionism, or falling in love with statues, is a rare form of 

erotomania founded on the sense of vision and closely related to 

the allurement of beauty. (I here use "pygmalionism" as a general 

term for the sexual love of statues; it is sometimes restricted 

to cases in which a man requires of a prostitute that she shall 

assume the part of a statue which gradually comes to life, and 

finds sexual gratification in this performance alone; Eulenburg 

quotes examples, _Sexuale Neuropathie_, p. 107.) An emotional 

interest in statues is by no means uncommon among young men 

during adolescence. Heine, in _Florentine Nights_, records the 

experiences of a boy who conceived a sentimental love for a 

statue, and, as this book appears to be largely autobiographical, 

the incident may have been founded on fact. Youths have sometimes 

masturbated before statues, and even before the image of the 

Virgin; such cases are known to priests and mentioned in manuals 

for confessors. Pygmalionism appears to have been not uncommon 

among the ancient Greeks, and this has been ascribed to their 

aesthetic sense; but the manifestation is due rather to the 

absence than to the presence of aesthetic feeling, and we may 

observe among ourselves that it is the ignorant and uncultured 

who feel the indecency of statues and thus betray their sense of 

the sexual appeal of such objects. We have to remember that in 

Greece statues played a very prominent part in life, and also 

that they were tinted, and thus more lifelike than with us. 

Lucian, Athenaeus, AElian, and others refer to cases of men who 


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