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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the sight of their bodies, which I love to look at, to stroke, to 

kiss all over." 

 

It is interesting to point out, in this connection, that the 

admiration of strength is not confined to the human female. It is 

by the spectacle of his force that the male among many of the 

lower animals sexually affects the female. Darwin duly allows for 

this fact, while some evolutionists, and notably Wallace, 

consider that it covers the whole field of sexual selection. When 

choice exists, Wallace states, "all the facts appear to be 

consistent with the choice depending on a variety of male 

characteristics, with some of which color is often correlated. 

Thus, it is the opinion of some of the best observers that vigor 

and liveliness are most attractive, and these are, no doubt, 

usually associated with some intensity of color, ... There is 

reason to believe that it is his [the male bird's] persistency 

and energy rather than his beauty which wins the day." (A.R. 

Wallace, _Tropical Nature_, 1898, p. 199.) In his later book, 

_Darwinism_ (p. 295), Wallace reaffirms his position that sexual 

selection means that in the rivalry of males for the female the 

most vigorous secures the advantage; "ornament," he adds, "is the 

natural product and direct outcome of superabundant health and 

vigor." As regards woman's love of strength, see Westermarck, 

_History of Marriage_, p. 255. 

 

Women admire a man's strength rather than his beauty. This statement is 

commonly made, and with truth, but, so far as I am aware, its meaning is 

never analyzed. When we look into it, I think, we shall find that it leads 

us into a special division of the visual sphere of sexual allurement. The 

spectacle of force, while it remains strictly within the field of vision, 

really brings to us, although unconsciously, impressions that are 

correlated with another sense--that of touch. We instinctively and 

unconsciously translate visible energy into energy of pressure. In 

admiring strength we are really admiring a tactile quality which has been 

made visible. It may therefore be said that, while through vision men are 

sexually affected mainly by the more purely visual quality of beauty, 

women are more strongly affected by visual impressions which express 

qualities belonging to the more fundamentally sexual sense of touch. 

 

The distinction between the man's view and the woman's view, here pointed 

out, is not, it must be added, absolute. Even for a man, beauty, with all 

these components which we have already analyzed in it, is not the sole 

sexual allurement of vision. A woman is not necessarily sexually 

attractive in the ratio of her beauty, and with even a high degree of 

beauty may have a low degree of attraction. The addition of vivacity or 

the addition of languor may each furnish a sexual allurement, and each of 

these is a translated tactile quality which possesses an obscure potency 


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