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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

from vague sexual implications.[170] But while in the man the demand for 

these translated pressure qualities in the visible attractiveness of a 

woman are not usually quite clearly realized, in a woman the corresponding 

craving for the visual expression of pressure energy is much more 

pronounced and predominant. It is not difficult to see why this should be 

so, even without falling back on the usual explanation that natural 

selection implies that the female shall choose the male who will be the 

most likely father of strong children and the best protector of his 

family. The more energetic part in physical love belongs to the man, the 

more passive part to the woman; so that, while energy in a woman is no 

index to effectiveness in love, energy in a man furnishes a seeming index 

to the existence of the primary quality of sexual energy which a woman 

demands of a man in the sexual embrace. It may be a fallacious index, for 

muscular strength is not necessarily correlated with sexual vigor, and in 

its extreme degrees appears to be more correlated with its absence. But it 

furnishes, in Stendhal's phrase, a probability of passion, and in any case 

it still remains a symbol which cannot be without its effect. We must not, 

of course, suppose that these considerations are always or often present 

to the consciousness of the maiden who "blushingly turns from Adonis to 

Hercules," but the emotional attitude is rooted in more or less unerring 

instincts. In this way it happens that even in the field of visual 

attraction sexual selection influences women on the underlying basis of 

the more primitive sense of touch, the fundamentally sexual sense. 

 

Women are very sensitive to the quality of a man's touch, and 

appear to seek and enjoy contact and pressure to a greater extent 

than do men, although in early adolescence this impulse seems to 

be marked in both sexes. "There is something strangely winning to 

most women," remarks George Eliot, in _The Mill on the Floss_, 

"in that offer of the firm arm; the help is not wanted physically 

at that moment, but the sense of help--the presence of strength 

that is outside them and yet theirs--meets a continual want of 

the imagination." 

 

Women are often very critical concerning a man's touch and his 

method of shaking hands. Stanley Hall (_Adolescence_, vol. ii, p. 

8) quotes a gifted lady as remarking: "I used to say that, 

however much I liked a man, I could never marry him if I did not 

like the touch of his hand, and I feel so yet." 

 

Among the elements of sexual attractiveness which make a special 

appeal to women, extreme personal cleanliness would appear to 

take higher rank than it takes in the eyes of a man, some men, 

indeed, seeming to make surprisingly small demands of a woman in 

this respect. If this is so we may connect it with the fact that 


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