Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

beauty in a woman's eye is to a much greater extent than in a 

man's a picture of energy, in other words, a translation of 

pressure contracts, with which the question of physical purity is 

necessarily more intimately associated than it is with the 

picture of purely visual beauty. It is noteworthy that Ovid (_Ars 

Amandi_, lib. I) urges men who desire to please women to leave 

the arts of adornment and effeminacy to those whose loves are 

homosexual, and to practice a scrupulous attention to extreme 

neatness and cleanliness of body and garments in every detail, a 

sun-browned skin, and the absence of all odor. Some two thousand 

years later Brummell in an age when extravagance and effeminacy 

often marked the fashions of men, introduced a new ideal of 

unobtrusive simplicity, extreme cleanliness (with avoidance of 

perfumes), and exquisite good taste; he abhorred all 

eccentricity, and may be said to have constituted a tradition 

which Englishmen have ever since sought, more or less 

successfully to follow; he was idolized by women. 

 

It may be added that the attentiveness of women to tactile 

contacts is indicated by the frequency with which in them it 

takes on morbid forms, as the _delire du contact_, the horror of 

contamination, the exaggerated fear of touching dirt. (See, e.g., 

Raymond and Janet, _Les Obsessions et la Psychasthenie_.) 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[168] William Ellis, _Polynesian Researches_, second edition, 1832, vol. 

1, p. 215. 

 

[169] Stendhal (_De l'Amour_, Chapter XVIII) has some remarks on this 

point, and refers to the influence over women possessed by Lekain, the 

famous actor, who was singularly ugly. "It is _passion_," he remarks, 

"which we demand; beauty only furnishes _probabilities_." 

 

[170] The charm of a woman's garments to a man is often due in part to 

their expressiveness in rendering impressions of energy, vivacity, or 

languor. This has often been realized by the poets, and notably by 

Herrick, who was singularly sensitive to these qualities in a woman's 

garments. 

 


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