Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

this feeling may perhaps be associated the feeling, certainly very widely 

felt, that one would not like to marry a person of foreign, even though 

closely allied, race. 

 

From the same number of the _Round-About_ from which I have 

extracted the data on stature, I have obtained corresponding data 

on pigmentation, and have embodied them in the following table. 

They are likewise very scanty, but they probably furnish as good 

a general indication of the drift of ideals in this matter as we 

should obtain from more extensive data of the same character. 

 

WOMEN. MEN. TOTALS. 

 

Fair women seek fair men. 2 Fair men seek fair women 2 4 

Dark woman seeks dark man 1 Dark men seek dark women 7 8 

 

Seek parity.......... 3 Seek parity......... 9 12 

 

Fair women seek dark men. 4 Fair men seek dark women 3 7 

Dark woman seeks fair man 1 Dark men seek fair women 4 5 

Medium-colored man seeks 

Seek disparity....... 5 dark woman ........... 1 1 

Medium-colored man seeks 

fair woman ........... 1 1 

 

Seek disparity...... 9 14 

 

Men of unknown color seek 

dark women ........... 3 3 

 

It will be seen that in the case of pigmentation there is not as 

in the case of stature a decided charm of parity in the formation 

of sexual ideals. The phenomenon, however, remains essentially 

analogous. Just as in regard to stature there is without 

exception an abstract admiration for tall persons, so here, 

though to a less marked extent, there is a general admiration for 

dark persons. As many as 6 out of 8 women and 14 out of 21 men 

seek a dark partner. This tendency ranges itself with the 

considerations already brought forward (p. 182), leading us to 

believe that, in England at all events, the admiration of 

fairness is not efficacious to promote any sexual selection, and 

that if there is actually any such selection it must be put down 

to other causes. No doubt, even in England the abstract aesthetic 

admiration of fairness is justifiable and may influence the 

artist. Probably also it influences the poet, who is affected by 

a long-established convention in favor of fairness, and perhaps 

also by a general tendency on the part of our poets to be 

themselves fair and to yield to the charm of parity,--the 

tendency to prefer the women of one's own stock,--which we have 

already found to be a real force.[175] But, as a matter of fact, 

our famous English beauties are not very fair; probably our 

handsomest men are not very fair, and the abstract sexual ideals 

of both our men and our women thus go out toward the dark. 

 

The formation of a sexual ideal, while it furnishes a predisposition to be 


Page 4 from 8:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   8   Forward