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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

struck by the resemblances already existing immediately after marriage. In 

order to test the matter he obtained the photographs of 251 young and old 

married couples not personally known to him. The results were as follows: 

 

RESEMBLANCES NONRESEMBLANCES 

COUPLES. (PERCENTAGE). (PERCENTAGE). TOTAL. 

 

Young.............. 132, about 66,66 66, about 33.33 198 

Old ................ 38, about 71.70 15, about 28.30 53 

 

He concluded that in the immense majority of marriages of inclination the 

contracting parties are attracted by similarities, and not by 

dissimilarities, and that, consequently, the resemblances between aged 

married couples are not acquired during conjugal life. Although Fol's 

results were not obtained by good methods, and do not cover definite 

points like stature and eye-color, they represented the conclusions of a 

highly skilled and acute observer and have since been amply confirmed. 

 

Galton could not find that the average results from a fairly large number 

of cases indicated that stature, eye-color, or other personal 

characteristics notably influenced sexual selection, as evidenced by a 

comparison of married couples.[180] Karl Pearson, however, in part making 

use of a large body of data obtained by Galton, referring to stature and 

eye-color, has reached the conclusion that sexual selection ultimately 

results in a marked degree of parity so far as these characters are 

concerned.[181] As regards stature, he is unable to find evidence of what 

he terms "preferential mating"; that is to say, it does not appear that 

any preconceived ideals concerning the desirability of tallness in sexual 

mates leads to any perceptibly greater tallness of the chosen mate; 

husbands are not taller than men in general, nor wives than women in 

general. In regard to eye-color, however, there appeared to be evidence of 

preferential mating. Husbands are very decidedly fairer than men in 

general, and though there is no such marked difference in women, wives are 

also somewhat fairer than women in general. As regards "assortative 

mating" as it is termed by Pearson,--the tendency to parity or to 

disparity between husbands and wives,--the result were in both cases 

decisive. Tall men marry women who are somewhat above the average in 

height; short men marry women who are somewhat below the average, so that 

husband and wife resemble each other in stature as closely as uncle and 

niece. As regards eye-color there is also a tendency for like to marry 

like; the light-eyed men tend to marry light-eyed women more often than 

dark-eyed women; the dark-eyed men tend to marry dark-eyed women more 

often than light-eyed. There remains, however, a very considerable 

difference in the eye-color of husband and wife; in the 774 couples dealt 

with by Pearson there are 333 dark-eyed women to only 251 dark-eyed men, 

and 523 light-eyed men to only 441 light-eyed women. The women in the 


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