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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

indicated by the fact that in some languages, as in that of the 

Fuegians,[12] the same word is applied to both. That ordinary tickling is 

not sexual is due to the circumstances of the case and the regions to 

which the tickling is applied. If, however, the tickling is applied within 

the sexual sphere, then there is a tendency for orgasm to take place 

instead of laughter. The connection which, through the phenomena of 

tickling, laughter thus bears to the sexual sphere is well indicated, as 

Groos has pointed out, by the fact that in sexually-minded people sexual 

allusions tend to produce laughter, this being the method by which they 

are diverted from the risks of more specifically sexual detumescence.[13] 

 

Reference has been made to the view of Alrutz, according to which 

tickling is a milder degree of itching. It is more convenient and 

probably more correct to regard itching or pruritus, as it is 

termed in its pathological forms, as a distinct sensation, for it 

does not arise under precisely the same conditions as tickling 

nor is it relieved in the same way. There is interest, however, 

in pointing out in this connection that, like tickling, itching 

has a real parallelism to the specialized sexual sensations. 

Bronson, who has very ably interpreted the sensations of itching 

(New York Neurological Society, October 7, 1890; _Medical News_, 

February 14, 1903, and summarized in the _British Medical 

Journal_, March 7, 1903; and elsewhere), regards it as a 

perversion of the sense of touch, a dysaesthesia due to obstructed 

nerve-excitation with imperfect conduction of the generated force 

into correlated nervous energy. The scratching which relieves 

itching directs the nervous energy into freer channels, sometimes 

substituting for the pruritus either painful or voluptuous 

sensations. Such voluptuous sensations may be regarded as a 

generalized aphrodisiac sense comparable to the specialized 

sexual orgasm. Bronson refers to the significant fact that 

itching occurs so frequently in the sexual region, and states 

that sexual neurasthenia is sometimes the only discoverable cause 

of genital and anal pruritus. (Cf. discussion on pruritus, 

_British Medical Journal_, November 30, 1895.) Gilman, again 

(_American Journal of Psychology_, vi, p. 22), considers that 

scratching, as well as sneezing, is comparable to coitus. 

 

The sexual embrace has an intimate connection with the phenomena of 

ticklishness which could not fail to be recognized. This connection is, 

indeed, the basis of Spinoza's famous definition of love,--"_Amor est 

titillatio quaedam concomitante idea causae externae_,"--a statement which 

seems to be reflected in Chamfort's definition of love as "_l'echange de 

deux fantaisies, et le contact de deux epidermes_." The sexual act, says 

Gowers, is, in fact, a skin reflex.[14] "The sexual parts," Hall and Allin 


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