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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

opposing demands of more fundamental differences in custom and occupation. 

But this cause by no means adequately accounts for them, since it may 

sometimes happen that what in one land is the practice of the men is in 

another the practice of the women, and yet the practices of the two sexes 

are still opposed[194]. Men instinctively desire to avoid doing things in 

women's ways, and women instinctively avoid doing things in men's ways, 

yet both sexes admire in the other sex those things which in themselves 

they avoid. In the matter of clothing this charm of disparity reaches its 

highest point, and it has constantly happened that men have even called in 

the aid of religion to enforce a distinction which seemed to them so 

urgent[195]. One of the greatest of sex allurements would be lost and the 

extreme importance of clothes would disappear at once if the two sexes 

were to dress alike; such identity of dress has, however, never come about 

among any people. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[171] L. da Vinci, _Frammenti_, selected by Solmi, pp. 177-180. 

 

[172] Westermarck, who accepts the "charm of disparity," gives references, 

_History of Human Marriage_, p. 354. 

 

[173] _Descent of Man_. Part II, Chapter XVIII. 

 

[174] Bloch (_Beitraege zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, Teil II, 

pp. 260 et seq.) refers to the tendency to admixture of races and to the 

sexual attraction occasionally exerted by the negress and sometimes the 

negro on white persons as evidence in favor of such charm of disparity. In 

part, however, we are here concerned with vague statements concerning 

imperfectly known facts, in part with merely individual variations, and 

with that love of the exotic under the stimulation of civilized conditions 

to which reference has already been made (p. 184). 

 

[175] In this connection the exceptional case of Tennyson is of interest. 

He was born and bred in the very fairest part of England (Lincolnshire), 

but he himself and the stock from which he sprang were dark to a very 

remarkable degree. In his work, although it reveals traces of the 

conventional admiration for the fair, there is a marked and unusual 

admiration for distinctly dark women, the women resembling the stock to 

which he himself belonged. See Havelock Ellis, "The Color Sense in 

Literature," _Contemporary Review_, May, 1896. 

 

[176] It is noteworthy that in the _Round-About_, already referred to, 

although no man expresses a desire to meet a short woman, when he refers 

to announcements by women as being such as would be likely to suit him, 

the persons thus pointed out are in a notable proportion short. 

 

[177] It has been discussed by F.J. Debret, _La Selection Naturelle dans 

l'espece humaine_ (These de Paris), 1901. Debret regards it as due to 

natural selection. 

 

[178] "Heredite de la Couleur des Yeux dans l'espece humaine," _Archives 

des Sciences physiques et naturelles_, ser. iii, vol. xii, 1884, p. 109. 

 

[179] _Revue Scientifique_, Jan., 1891. 


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