Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

[180] F. Galton, _Natural Inheritance_, p. 85. It may be remarked that 

while Galton's tables on page 206 show a slight excess of disparity as 

regards sexual selection in stature, in regard to eye color they 

anticipate Karl Pearson's more extensive data and in marriages of 

disparity show a decided deficiency of observed over chance results. In 

_English Men of Science_ (pp. 28-33), also, Galton found that among the 

parents parity decidedly prevailed over disparity (78 to 31) alike as 

regards temperament, hair color, and eye color. 

 

[181] Karl Pearson, _Phil. Trans. Royal Society_, vol. clxxxvii, p. 273, 

and vol. cxcv, p. 113; _Proceedings of the Royal Society_, vol. lxvi, p. 

28; _Grammar of Science_, second edition, 1900, pp. 425 _et seq._; 

_Biometrika_, November, 1903. The last-named periodical also contains a 

study on "Assortative Mating in Man," bringing forward evidence to show 

that, apart from environmental influence, "length of life is a character 

which is subject to selection;" that is to say, the long-lived tend to 

marry the long-lived, and the short-lived to marry the short-lived. 

 

[182] For a summary of the evidence on this point see Havelock Ellis, _Man 

and Woman_, fourth edition, 1904, pp. 256-264. 

 

[183] "The Comparative Abilities of the Fair and the Dark," _Monthly 

Review_, August, 1901. 

 

[184] The fact that even in Europe the abhorrence to incest is not always 

strongly felt is brought out by Bloch, _Beitraege zur AEtiologie der 

Psychopathia Sexualis_, Teil II, pp. 263 et seq. 

 

[185] Westermarck, _History of Marriage_, Chapters XIV and XV. 

 

[186] Crawley (_The Mystic Rose_, p. 446) has pointed out that it is not 

legitimate to assume the possibility of an "instinct" of this character; 

instinct has "nothing in its character but a response of function to 

environment." 

 

[187] Fromentin, in his largely autobiographic novel _Dominique_, makes 

Olivier say: "Julie is my cousin, which is perhaps a reason why she should 

please me less than anyone else. I have always known her. We have, as it 

were, slept in the same cradle. There may be people who would be attracted 

by this almost fraternal relationship. To me the very idea of marrying 

someone whom I knew as a baby is as absurd as that of coupling two dolls." 

 

[188] It may well be, as Crawley argues (_The Mystic Rose_, Chapter XVII), 

that sexual taboo plays some part among primitive people in preventing 

incestuous union, as, undoubtedly, training and moral ideas do among 

civilized peoples. 

 

[189] The remarks of the Marquis de Brisay, an authority on doves, as 

communicated to Giard (_L'Intermediare des Biologistes_, November 20, 

1897), are of much interest on this point, since they correspond to what 

we find in the human species: "Two birds from the same nest rarely couple. 

Birds coming from the same nest behave as though they regarded coupling as 

prohibited, or, rather, they know each other too well, and seem to be 

ignorant of their difference in sex, remaining unaffected in their 


Page 5 from 8:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   7   8   Forward