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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

relations by the changes which make them adults." Westermarck (op. cit., 

p. 334) has some remarks on a somewhat similar tendency sometimes observed 

in dogs and horses. 

 

[190] See Appendix to vol. lii of these _Studies_, "The Sexual Impulse 

among Savages." 

 

[191] See, especially, _ante_, pp. 163 et seq. 

 

[192] Kistemaecker, as quoted by Bloch (_Beitraege, etc._, ii. p. 340), 

alludes in this connection to the dark clothes of men and to the tendency 

of women to wear lighter garments, to emphasize the white underlinen, to 

cultivate pallor of the face, to use powder. "I am white and you are 

brown; ergo, you must love me"; this affirmation, he states, may be found 

in the depths of every woman's heart. 

 

[193] K. Pearson, _Grammar of Science_, second edition, p. 430. 

 

[194] In _Man and Woman_ (fourth edition, p. 65) I have referred to a 

curious example of this tendency to opposition, which is of almost 

worldwide extent. Among some people it is, or has been, the custom for the 

women to stand during urination, and in these countries it is usually the 

custom for the man to squat; in most countries the practices of the sexes 

in this matter are opposed. 

 

[195] It is sufficient to quote one example. At the end of the sixteenth 

century it was a serious objection to the fashionable wife of an English 

Brownist pastor in Amsterdam that she had "bodies [a bodice or corset] 

tied to the petticoat with points [laces] as men do their doublets and 

their hose, contrary to I Thess., v, 22, conferred with Deut. xxii, 5; and 

I John ii, 16." 

 

V. 

 

Summary of the Conclusions at Present Attainable in Regard to the Nature 

of Beauty and its Relation to Sexual Selection. 

 

 

The consideration of vision has led us into a region in which, more 

definitely and precisely than is the case with any other sense, we can 

observe and even hope to measure the operation of sexual selection in man. 

In the conception of feminine beauty we possess an instrument of universal 

extension by which it seems possible to measure the nature and extent of 

such selection as exercised by men on women. This conception, with which 

we set out, is, however, by no means so precise, so easily available for 

the attainment of sound conclusions, as at first it may seem to be. 

 

It is true that beauty is not, as some have supposed, a mere matter of 

caprice. It rests in part on (1) an objective basis of aesthetic character 

which holds all its variations together and leads to a remarkable 

approximation among the ideals of feminine beauty cherished by the most 

intelligent men of all races. But beyond this general objective basis we 

find that (2) the specific characters of the race or nation tend to cause 

divergence in the ideals of beauty, since beauty is often held to consist 

in the extreme development of these racial or national anthropological 

features; and it would, indeed, appear that the full development of racial 


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