Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

are either ideally or practically the most fit mates, display a greater 

energy and achieve a greater success than others in securing partners. 

These individuals possess a greater constitutional vigor, physical or 

mental, which conduces to their success in practical affairs generally, 

and probably also heightens their specifically philogamic activities. 

 

Thus, the problem of human sexual selection is in the highest degree 

complicated. When we gather together such scanty data of precise nature as 

are at present available, we realize that, while generally according with 

the results which the evidence not of a quantitative nature would lead us 

to accept, their precise significance is not at present altogether clear. 

It would appear on the whole that in choosing a mate we tend to seek 

parity of racial and individual characters together with disparity of 

secondary sexual characters. But we need a much larger number of groups of 

evidence of varying character and obtained under varying conditions. Such 

evidence will doubtless accumulate now that its nature is becoming defined 

and the need for it recognized. In the meanwhile we are, at all events, in 

a position to assert, even with the evidence before us, that now that the 

real meaning of sexual selection is becoming clear its efficacy in human 

evolution can no longer be questioned. 

 


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