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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

unknown. 

 

The impulse to bite is also a part of the tactile element which lies at 

the origin of kissing. As Stanley Hall notes, children are fond of biting, 

though by no means always as a method of affection. There is, however, in 

biting a distinctly sexual origin to invoke, for among many animals the 

teeth (and among birds the bill) are used by the male to grasp the female 

more firmly during intercourse. This point has been discussed in the 

previous volume of these _Studies_ in reference to "Love and Pain," and 

it is unnecessary to enter into further details here. The heroine of 

Kleist's _Penthesilea_ remarks: "Kissing (Kuesse) rhymes with biting 

(Bisse), and one who loves with the whole heart may easily confound the 

two." 

 

The kiss, as known in Europe, has developed on a sensory basis that is 

mainly tactile, although an olfactory element may sometimes coexist. The 

kiss thus understood is not very widely spread and is not usually found 

among rude and uncultured peoples. We can trace it in Aryan and Semitic 

antiquity, but in no very pronounced form; Homer scarcely knew it, and the 

Greek poets seldom mention it. Today it may be said to be known all over 

Europe except in Lapland. Even in Europe it is probably a comparatively 

modern discovery; and in all the Celtic tongues, Rhys states, there is no 

word for "kiss," the word employed being always borrowed from the Latin 

_pax_.[202] At a fairly early historic period, however, the Welsh Cymri, 

at all events, acquired a knowledge of the kiss, but it was regarded as a 

serious matter and very sparingly used, being by law only permitted on 

special occasions, as at a game called rope-playing or a carousal; 

otherwise a wife who kissed a man not her husband could be repudiated. 

Throughout eastern Asia it is unknown; thus, in Japanese literature kisses 

and embraces have no existence. "Kisses, and embraces are simply unknown 

in Japan as tokens of affection," Lafcadio Hearn states, "if we except the 

solitary fact that Japanese mothers, like mothers all over the world, lip 

and hug their little ones betimes. After babyhood there is no more hugging 

or kisses; such actions, except in the case of infants, are held to be 

immodest. Never do girls kiss one another; never do parents kiss or 

embrace their children who have become able to walk." This holds true, and 

has always held true, of all classes; hand-clasping is also foreign to 

them. On meeting after a long absence, Hearn remarks, they smile, perhaps 

cry a little, they may even stroke each other, but that is all. Japanese 

affection "is chiefly shown in acts of exquisite courtesy and 

kindness."[203] Among nearly all of the black races of Africa lovers never 

kiss nor do mothers usually kiss their babies.[204] Among the American 

Indians the tactile kiss is, for the most part, unknown, though here and 

there, as among the Fuegians, lovers rub their cheeks together.[205] 

Kissing is unknown to the Malays. In North Queensland, however, Roth 


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