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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

mourning, and of sympathy.[216] In the Malay archipelago, it is said, the 

same word is used for "greeting" and "smelling." Among the Dyaks of the 

Malay archipelago, however, Vaughan Stevens states that any form of 

kissing is unknown.[217] In Borneo, Breitenstein tells us, kissing is a 

kind of smelling, the word for smelling being used, but he never himself 

saw a man kiss a woman; it is always done in private.[218] 

 

The olfactory kiss is thus seen to have a much wider extension over the 

world than the European (or Mediterranean) tactile kiss. In its most 

complete development, however, it is mainly found among the people of 

Mongolian race, or those yellow peoples more or less related to them. 

 

The literature of the kiss is extensive. So far, however, as that 

literature is known to me, the following list includes everything that may 

be profitably studied: Darwin, _The Expression of the Emotions_; Ling 

Roth, "Salutations," _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, November, 

1889; K. Andree, "Nasengruss," _Ethnographische Parallelen_, second 

series, 1889, pp. 223-227; Alfred Kirchhoff, "Vom Ursprung des Kuesses," 

_Deutsche Revue_, May, 1895; Lombroso, "L'Origine du Baiser," _Nouvelle 

Revue_, 1897, p. 153; Paul d'Enjoy, "Le Baiser en Europe et en Chine," 

_Bulletin de la Societe d'Anthropologie_, Paris, 1897, fasc. 2. Professor 

Nyrop's book, _The Kiss and its History_ (translated from the Danish by 

W.F. Harvey), deals rather with the history of the kiss in civilization 

and literature than with its biological origins and psychological 

significance. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[196] E. Selous, _Bird Watching_, 1901, p. 191. This author adds: "It 

seems probable indeed that the conferring a practical benefit of the kind 

indicated may be the origin of the caress throughout nature." 

 

[197] Tylor terms the kiss "the salute by tasting," and d'Enjoy defines it 

as "a bite and a suction"; there seems, however, little evidence to show 

that the kiss contains any gustatory element in the strict sense. 

 

[198] Compayre, _L'Evolution intellectuelle et morale de l'enfant_, p. 9. 

 

[199] Mantegazza, _Physiognomy and Expression_, p. 144. 

 

[200] G. Stanley Hall, "The Early Sense of Self," _American Journal of 

Psychology_, April, 1898, p. 361. 

 

[201] In some parts of the world the impulse persists into adult life. Sir 

S. Baker (_Ismailia_, p. 472) mentions licking the eyes as a sign of 

affection. 

 

[202] _Book of Common Prayer in Manx Gaelic_, edited by A.W. Moore and J. 

Rhys, 1895. 

 

[203] L. Hearn, _Out of the East_, 1895, p. 103. 

 

[204] See, e.g., A.B. Ellis, _Tshi-speaking Peoples_, p. 288. Among the 

Swahili the kiss is practiced, but exclusively between married people and 

with very young children. Velten believes they learned it from the Arabs. 

 

[205] Hyades and Deniker, _Mission Scientifique du Cap Horn_, vol. vii, p. 

245. 

 

[206] W. Roth, _Ethnological Notes Among the Queensland Aborigines_, p. 


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