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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

(_Archives des Sciences Biologiques_, St. Petersburg, 1895, 

summarized in _L'Annee Biologique_; 1895, p. 329). Ribbert, 

again, cut out the mammary gland of a young rabbit and 

transplanted it into the ear; five months after the rabbit bore 

young and the gland secreted milk freely. The case has been 

reported of a woman whose spinal cord was destroyed by an 

accident at the level of the fifth and sixth dorsal vertebrae, 

yet lactation was perfectly normal (_British Medical Journal_, 

August 5, 1899, p. 374). We are driven to suppose that there is 

some chemical change in the blood, some internal secretion from 

the uterus or the ovaries, which acts as a direct stimulant to 

the breasts. (See a comprehensive discussion of the phenomena of 

the connection between the breasts and sexual organs, though the 

conclusions are not unassailable, by Temesvary, _Journal of 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the British Empire_, June, 1903). 

That this hypothetical secretion starts from the womb rather than 

the ovaries seems to be indicated by the fact that removal of 

both ovaries during pregnancy will not suffice to prevent 

lactation. In favor of the ovaries, see Beatson, _Lancet_, July, 

1896; in favor of the uterus, Armand Routh, "On the Interaction 

between the Ovaries and the Mammary Glands," _British Medical 

Journal_, September 30, 1899. 

 

 

 


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