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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Mediterranean basin, from a different level of culture; it found its 

supporters in a new and lower social stratum. The cult of charity, 

simplicity, and faith, while not primarily ascetic, became inevitably 

allied with asceticism, because from its point of view: sexuality was the 

very stronghold of the classic world. In the second century the genius of 

Clement of Alexandria and of the great Christian thinkers who followed him 

seized on all those elements in classic life and philosophy which could be 

amalgamated with Christianity without, as they trusted, destroying its 

essence, but in the matter of sexuality there could be no compromise, and 

the condemnation of sexuality involved the condemnation of the bath. It 

required very little insight and sagacity for the Christians to 

see--though we are now apt to slur over the fact--that the cult of the 

bath was in very truth the cult of the flesh.[22] However profound their 

ignorance of anatomy, physiology, and psychology might be, they had 

before them ample evidence to show that the skin is an outlying sexual 

zone and that every application which promoted the purity, brilliance, and 

healthfulness of the skin constituted a direct appeal, feeble or strong as 

the case might be, to those passions against which they were warring. The 

moral was evident: better let the temporary garment of your flesh be 

soaked with dirt than risk staining the radiant purity of your immortal 

soul. If Christianity had not drawn that moral with clear insight and 

relentless logic Christianity would never have been a great force in the 

world. 

 

If any doubt is felt as to the really essential character of the 

connection between cleanliness and the sexual impulse it may be 

dispelled by the consideration that the association is by no 

means confined to Christian Europe. If we go outside Europe and 

even Christendom altogether, to the other side of the world, we 

find it still well marked. The wantonness of the luxurious people 

of Tahiti when first discovered by European voyagers is 

notorious. The Areoi of Tahiti, a society largely constituted on 

a basis of debauchery, is a unique institution so far as 

primitive peoples are concerned. Cook, after giving one of the 

earliest descriptions of this society and its objects at Tahiti 

(Hawkesworth, _An Account of Voyages_, etc., 1775, vol. ii, p. 

55), immediately goes on to describe the extreme and scrupulous 

cleanliness of the people of Tahiti in every respect; they not 

only bathed their bodies and clothes every day, but in all 

respects they carried cleanliness to a higher point than even 

"the politest assembly in Europe." Another traveler bears similar 

testimony: "The inhabitants of the Society Isles are, among all 

the nations of the South Seas, the most cleanly; and the better 

sort of them carry cleanliness to a very great length"; they 


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