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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

bathe morning and evening in the sea, he remarks, and afterward 

in fresh water to remove the particles of salt, wash their hands 

before and after meals, etc. (J.R. Forster, "_Observations made 

during a Voyage round the World_," 1798, p. 398.) And William 

Ellis, in his detailed description of the people of Tahiti 

(_Polynesian Researches_, 1832, vol. i, especially Chapters VI 

and IX), while emphasizing their extreme cleanliness, every 

person of every class bathing at least once or twice a day, 

dwells on what he considers their unspeakable moral debasement; 

"notwithstanding the apparent mildness of their disposition and 

the cheerful vivacity of their conversation, no portion of the 

human race was ever perhaps sunk lower in brutal licentiousness 

and moral degradation." 

 

After leaving Tahiti Cook went on to New Zealand. Here he found 

that the people were more virtuous than at Tahiti, and also, he 

found, less clean. 

 

It is, however, a mistake to suppose that physical uncleanliness ruled 

supreme through mediaeval and later times. It is true that the eighteenth 

century, which saw the birth of so much that marks our modern world, 

witnessed a revival of the old ideal of bodily purity. But the struggle 

between two opposing ideals had been carried on for a thousand years or 

more before this. The Church, indeed, was in this matter founded on an 

impregnable rock. But there never has been a time when influences outside 

the Church have not found a shelter somewhere. Those traditions of the 

classic world which Christianity threw aside as useless or worse quietly 

reappeared. In no respect was this more notably the case than in regard to 

the love of pure water and the cult of the bath. Islam adopted the 

complete Roman bath, and made it an institution of daily life, a necessity 

for all classes. Granada is the spot in Europe where to-day we find the 

most exquisite remains of Mohammedan culture, and, though the fury of 

Christian conquest dragged the harrow over the soil of Granada, even yet 

streams and fountains spring up there and gush abundantly and one seldom 

loses the sound of the plash of water. The flower of Christian chivalry 

and Christian intelligence went to Palestine to wrest the Holy Sepulchre 

from the hands of pagan Mohammedans. They found there many excellent 

things which they had not gone out to seek, and the Crusaders produced a 

kind of premature and abortive Renaissance, the shadow of lost classic 

things reflected on Christian Europe from the mirror of Islam. 

 


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