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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the invectives of preachers, all went to the baths, young and 

old, rich and poor, and he makes the statement, which seems to 

echo the constant assertion of the early Fathers, that "a woman 

who frequented the baths returned home physically pure only at 

the expense of her moral purity." 

 

In Germany there was even greater freedom of manners in bathing, 

though, it would seem, less real licentiousness. Even the 

smallest towns had their baths, which were frequented by all 

classes. As soon as the horn blew to announce that the baths were 

ready all hastened along the street, the poorer folk almost 

completely undressing themselves before leaving their homes. 

Bathing was nearly always in common without any garment being 

worn, women attendants commonly rubbed and massaged both sexes, 

and the dressing room was frequently used by men and women in 

common; this led to obvious evils. The Germans, as Weinhold 

points out (_Die Deutschen Frauen im Mittelalter_, 1882, bd. ii, 

pp. 112 et seq.), have been fond of bathing in the open air in 

streams from the days of Tacitus and Caesar until comparatively 

modern times, when the police have interfered. It was the same in 

Switzerland. Poggio, early in the sixteenth century, found it the 

custom for men and women to bathe together at Baden, and said 

that he seemed to be assisting at the _floralia_ of ancient Rome, 

or in Plato's Republic. Senancour, who quotes the passage (_De 

l'Amour_, 1834, vol. i, p. 313), remarks that at the beginning of 

the nineteenth century there was still great liberty at the Baden 

baths. 

 

Of the thirteenth century in England Thomas Wright (_Homes of 

Other Days_, 1871, p. 271) remarks: "The practice of warm bathing 

prevailed very generally in all classes of society, and is 

frequently alluded to in the mediaeval romances and stories. For 

this purpose a large bathing-tub was used. People sometimes 

bathed immediately after rising in the morning, and we find the 

bath used after dinner and before going to bed. A bath was also 

often prepared for a visitor on his arrival from a journey; and, 

what seems still more singular, in the numerous stories of 

amorous intrigues the two lovers usually began their interviews 

by bathing together." 

 

In England the association between bathing and immorality was 

established with special rapidity and thoroughness. Baths were 

here officially recognized as brothels, and this as early as the 

twelfth century, under Henry II. These organized bath-brothels 

were confined to Southwark, outside the walls of the city, a 

quarter which was also given up to various sports and amusements. 

At a later period, "hot-houses," bagnios, and hummums (the 

eastern _hammam_) were spread all over London and remained 

closely identified with prostitution, these names, indeed, 


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