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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

interest in this connection, because we are thereby enabled to bring the 

psychology of lactation into intimate relationship with the psychology of 

sexual love. 

 

The extreme sensitiveness of the skin, the readiness with which its 

stimulation reverberates into the sexual sphere, clearly brought out by 

the present study, enable us to understand better a very ancient 

contest--the moral struggle around the bath. There has always been a 

tendency for the extreme cultivation of physical purity to lead on to the 

excessive stimulation of the sexual sphere; so that the Christian ascetics 

were entirely justified, on their premises, in fighting against the bath 

and in directly or indirectly fostering a cult of physical uncleanliness. 

While, however, in the past there has clearly been a general tendency for 

the cult of physical purity to be associated with moral licentiousness, 

and there are sufficient grounds for such an association, it is important 

to remember that it is not an inevitable and fatal association; a 

scrupulously clean person is by no means necessarily impelled to 

licentiousness; a physically unclean person is by no means necessarily 

morally pure. When we have eliminated certain forms of the bath which must 

be regarded as luxuries rather than hygienic necessities, though they 

occasionally possess therapeutic virtues, we have eliminated the most 

violent appeals of the bath to the sexual impulse. So imperative are the 

demands of physical purity now becoming, in general opinion, that such 

small risks to moral purity as may still remain are constantly and wisely 

disregarded, and the immoral traditions of the bath now, for the most 

part, belong to the past. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SMELL. 

 

I. 

 

The Primitiveness of Smell--The Anatomical Seat of the Olfactory 

Centres--Predominance of Smell among the Lower Mammals--Its Diminished 

Importance in Man--The Attention Paid to Odors by Savages. 

 

 

The first more highly organized sense to arise on the diffused tactile 

sensitivity of the skin is, in most cases, without doubt that of smell. At 

first, indeed, olfactory sensibility is not clearly differentiated from 

general tactile sensibility; the pit of thickened and ciliated epithelium 

or the highly mobile antennae which in many lower animals are sensitive to 

odorous stimuli are also extremely sensitive to tactile stimuli; this is, 

for instance, the case with the snail, in whom at the same time olfactive 

sensibility seems to be spread over the whole body.[24] The sense of smell 

is gradually specialized, and when taste also begins to develop a kind of 

chemical sense is constituted. The organ of smell, however, speedily 

begins to rise in importance as we ascend the zooelogical scale. In the 

lower vertebrates, when they began to adopt a life on dry land, the sense 

of smell seems to have been that part of their sensory equipment which 

proved most useful under the new conditions, and it developed with 


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