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Table of contents
PREFACE
TOUCH-1
TOUCH-2
TOUCH-3 (begin)
TOUCH-3 (end)
TOUCH-4 (begin)
TOUCH-4 (end)
SMELL-1
SMELL-2
SMELL-3.1
SMELL-3.2
SMELL-3.3
SMELL-3.4
SMELL-3.5
SMELL-4 (begin)
SMELL-4 (end)
SMELL-5
HEARING-1
HEARING-2
HEARING-3
VISION-1.1
VISION-1.2
VISION-1.3
VISION-2.1
VISION-2.2
VISION-2.3
VISION-2.4
VISION-3
VISION-4
VISION-5
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2.3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

blacks had a keener sense of smell than he possessed. 

 

In New Zealand the Maoris, as W. Colenso shows, possessed, 

formerly at all events, a very keen sense of smell or else were 

very attentive to smell, and their taste as regarded agreeable 

and disagreeable odors corresponded very closely to European 

taste, although it must be added that some of their common 

articles of food possessed a very offensive odor. They are not 

only sensitive to European perfumes, but possessed various 

perfumes of their own, derived from plants and possessing a 

pleasant, powerful, and lasting odor; the choicest and rarest was 

the gum of the _taramea_ (_Aciphylla Colensoi_), which was 

gathered by virgins after the use of prayers and charms. Sir 

Joseph Banks noted that Maori chiefs wore little bundles of 

perfumes around their necks, and Cook made the same observation 

concerning the young women. References to the four chief Maori 

perfumes are contained in a stanza which is still often hummed to 

express satisfaction, and sung by a mother to her child:-- 

 

"My little neck-satchel of sweet-scented moss, 

My little neck-satchel of fragrant fern, 

My little neck-satchel of odoriferous gum, 

My sweet-smelling neck-locket of sharp-pointed _taramea_." 

 

In the summer season the sleeping houses of Maori chiefs were 

often strewed with a large, sweet-scented, flowering grass of 

powerful odor. (W. Colenso, _Transactions of the New Zealand 

Institute_, vol. xxiv, reprinted in _Nature_, November 10, 1892.) 

 

Javanese women rub themselves with a mixture of chalk and strong 

essence which, when rubbed off, leaves a distinct perfume on the 

body. (Stratz, _Die Frauenkleidung_, p. 84.) 

 

The Samoans, Friedlaender states (_Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 

1899, p. 52), are very fond of fragrant and aromatic odors. He 

gives a list of some twenty odorous plants which they use, more 

especially as garlands for the head and neck, including 

ylang-ylang and gardenia; he remarks that of one of these plants 

(cordyline) he could not himself detect the odor. 

 

The Nicobarese, Man remarks (_Journal of the Anthropological 

Institute_, 1889, p. 377), like the natives of New Zealand, 

particularly dislike the smell of carbolic acid. Both young men 

and women are very partial to scents; the former say they find 

their use a certain passport to the favor of their wives, and 

they bring home from the jungle the scented leaves of a certain 

creeper to their sweethearts and wives. 

 

Swahili women devote much attention to perfuming themselves. When 

a woman wishes to make herself desirable she anoints herself all 

over with fragrant ointments, sprinkles herself with rose-water, 

puts perfume into her clothes, strews jasmine flowers on her bed 

as well as binding them round her neck and waist, and smokes 


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